Maven vs Gradle: Feature Comparison Chart

Why should I consider Gradle? What are its advantages over Apache Maven? Can it satisfy my specific needs? These are common questions people ask themselves when deciding whether to migrate from Maven or not, or whether to use Gradle for a new project. The tables below provide feature comparisons with Maven that will aid you in answering those questions.

You might be interested in the continuous build feature that automatically runs the build when it detects a relevant change. Or composite builds that allow you to replace a library dependency with a development version you’re working on. You may simply wonder whether Gradle supports convention-based Java builds (it does) that are also easy to customize. And perhaps you just want to know whether your builds will be significantly faster because of features like advanced incremental build (AKA up-to-date checks).

If you are considering migrating from Maven, we recommend that you also read through our Migrating from Maven to Gradle guide to get a sense of what’s involved and how much work it might require.

Table of Contents

Functional Testing and Build Logic

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Composite Build

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Execution Model

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Continuous Build

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Configuration Model

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Dependency Management

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Publishing Artifacts

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Performance

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Build Infrastructure Administration

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Embedding

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Ant Integration

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Android Support

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Native Language Support

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3

Other Features

Feature Gradle 3.4 Maven 3.3.3